Firing Squad claims lives of 8 Drug convicts in Indonesia

Execution of Maximilian, (center) the last emperor of Mexico on June 19, 1867 at Santiago de Querétaro, Mexico. together with his generals Mejia and miramon, from en.wikipedia.org covered under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License

 

Death by Firing Squad

Eight drug convicts were executed Tuesday, April 28, 2015 by firing squad of the government of Indonesia. After failed attempts for clemency by families, heads of state, and international organizations, the doomed convicts were transported to Indonesia’s Nusakambangan Prison Island where they were made to face “eight firing squads with 13 shooters each shot the prisoners.” The firing squads shot to death 8 people—seven of them foreigners—for their participation in drug crimes The eight convicts were shot at the same time at 12:35 a.m.   and were pronounced dead three minutes later. None missed, all shots hit the targets, said Attorney General H.M. Prasetyo, Wednesday, April 29, after inspecting the security prison in central Java. Atty. Gen. Prasetyo commented by saying that executing drug convicts isn’t a pleasant thing to do, but we have to stop drug trafficking, he said.

Drug convicts identified

Killed were 2 Australians, Myuran Sukumaran and Andrew Chan, who were convicted in 2006 as leaders of the “Bali 9” heroin-smuggling ring, 4 Nigerians, 1 Brazilian and 1 Indonesian. All eight had been jailed, convicted of possessing or trafficking drugs like heroin, cocaine and marijuana.

Execution of Veloso delayed

Mary Jane Veloso, a Filipino, would be executed at a later date. She was found guilty of trying to smuggle 2.6 kilograms of heroin into Indonesia in her luggage in 2010, Attorney General Prasetyo said Wednesday, April 29. Mary Jane Veloso’s execution was delayed after Philippine President Benigno Aquino III asked that she be allowed to testify in a human-trafficking trial, said Tony Spontana, a spokesman at the attorney general’s office. Pres. Aquino in his text message said Veloso’s presence was needed in the trial. A woman, Maria Cristina Sergio, was reported to have surrendered to police authorities Tuesday in the Philippines, alleging that her security was threatened.  Allegedly, the woman was the one who recruited Ms. Veloso to act as a drug courier. The police, however, clarified that Sergio did not surrender but only sought protection for alleged attempts on her life. The woman has denied that she recruited Veloso, according to the ucanews.com.

The Bali 9 case

The Bali-9 case has soured Indonesia’s ties with Australia, and the latter on Wednesday said it was sending back home its ambassador after the executions. PM Tony Abbott had asked for grant of clemency for the two Australians, who were convicted of masterminding a plan to export heroin from the resort island of Bali to Australia. Seven others in the case were sentenced to life imprisonment. The government said the executions as scheduled would proceed, providing the prisoners 72 -hour notice. On Tuesday ambulances carrying coffins arrived at the prison.

Status of Death Penalty in Indonesia

Capital or death penalty for drug smuggling and terrorism is lawful in Indonesia. Previous Pres. Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono during his 10-year term of office, allowed 14 executions, ten people in 2008 and four executions from 2009 to 2014. Fresh in office President Widodo allowed executions of 6 convicts, all non-Indonesians, in January, 2014. Pres. Widodo said the country is saddled with a drug emergency problem, citing a study that a number of Indonesians die each day from drug use. However, critics said the study isn’t reliable. Majority of Indonesians favor and support the death penalty in Indonesia. Almost one-third of the more than 130 people currently on death row are foreigners. Ambassadors for the Netherlands and Brazil were recalled  after their citizens were among those executed in January Sources:

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2 Comments

  1. melissae
    • titanick

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